TIMELINE This timeline provides a chronological overview of key Camp Lejeune Historic Drinking Water events. It is not intended to represent a comprehensive summary of events from 1941 to present. Scroll over timeline entries in bold for additional information. 1941 - 1979 1941: MCB Camp Lejeune is established. Hadnot Point housing is constructed and drinking water system began operation. 1952: Tarawa Terrace housing is constructed and Tarawa Terrace drinking water system began operation. 1953: Year ATSDR estimates Hadnot Point drinking water system was affected by chemicals. 1957: Year ATSDR estimates Tarawa Terrace drinking water system was affected by chemicals. 1972: Holcomb Boulevard drinking water system began operation. 1979: EPA published drinking water standards for THMs, a by-product of drinking water disinfection, and suggested drinking water levels for TCE, a solvent often used for cleaning weapons and machinery. 1980s 1980: EPA published suggested drinking water levels for PCE, a solvent often used for drycleaning. 1980-1981: The base sampled drinking water for THMs and other chemicals interfered with results. 1982: Special tap water testing identified TCE and PCE as the chemicals interfering with results. 1982-1984: The Navy initiated an environmental cleanup program to identify potentially contaminated sites at Camp Lejeune for further investigation. As part of this effort, drinking water wells near potentially contaminated sites were tested. 1984-1985: Based on chemicals detected in drinking water wells near potentially contaminated sites, the Base initiated a comprehensive drinking water well testing effort. Ten wells were identified as being impacted and were removed from service the same day. The Base notified residents and workers through notices and newspaper articles. 1987-1989: SDWA regulations for TCE, benzene, and vinyl chloride were published in the FR in 1987 and standards became effective and enforceable in 1989. 1990s 1991-1992: SDWA regulations for PCE were published in the FR in 1991 and standards became effective and enforceable in 1992. 1991-1997: ATSDR conducted and published a PHA. 1998: ATSDR published the results of its “Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes Study.” http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HS/lejeune/ 2000s 2003-2005: EPA/DOJ criminal investigation concluded no SDWA violations and no conspiracy to conceal evidence. 2004: Commandant of the Marine Corps established expert panel to examine past decision making. The panel reported no violations of law and no evidence of covering up information. https://clnr.hqi.usmc.mil/clwater/content/documents/2004_CMC_Fact_Finding_report.pdf 2005-2007: Government Accountability Office reviewed USMC actions and had no conclusions or recommendations. https://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07276.pdf 2007: USMC launched notification and registration campaign for former residents to sign up for more information by telephone or internet. 2007: ATSDR released its water modeling results for Tarawa Terrace and vicinity. http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/tarawaterrace.html 2009: ATSDR removed the PHA from its website and announced plans to re-evaluate the PHA drinking water portion when water modeling efforts are complete. 2009: NRC released its “Contaminated Drinking Water at Camp Lejeune” report. http://dels.nas.edu/Report/Contaminated-Water-Supplies-Camp-Lejeune/12618 2010s 2012: President Obama signed the “Honoring America’s Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012” into law. The VA began providing health care to eligible Camp Lejeune Veterans. 2013: ATSDR released its “Chapter A: Summary and Findings” water modeling report for the Hadnot Point and Holcomb Boulevard water treatment plants and vicinities at MCB Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/hadnotpoint.html 2013: ATSDR’s “Exposure to Contaminated Drinking Water and Specific Birth Defects and Childhood Cancers at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina” was published. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/update.html 2014: ATSDR’s “Evaluation of mortality among Marines and Navy personnel exposed to contaminated drinking water at USMC Base Camp Lejeune: A retrospective cohort study” was published. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/mortalitystudy.html 2014: ATSDR’s “Mortality study of civilian employees exposed to contaminated drinking water at MCB Camp Lejeune: a retrospective cohort study” was published. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/civilianmortalitystudy.html 2014: ATSDR’s “Evaluation of contaminated drinking water and preterm birth, SGA, and birth weight at MCB Camp Lejeune, North Carolina: a cross- sectional study” was published. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/adversebirthoutcomesstudy.html 2015: ATSDR’s “Evaluation of contaminated drinking water and male breast cancer at MCB Camp Lejeune, North Carolina: a case control study” was published. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/malebreastcancerstudy.html 2017: ATSDR’s “Camp Lejeune Drinking Water Public Health Assessment” was published. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/MarineCorpsBaseCampLejeune/ Camp_Lejeune_drinking_Water_PHA(final)_%201-20-2017_508.pdf 2017: VA issues presumptive service connection rule. ATSDR - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry CLHDW - Camp Lejeune Historic Drinking Water DOJ - Department of Justice EPA - Environmental Protection Agency FR - Federal Register MBW - Mean Birth Weight MCB - Marine Corps Base NRC - National Research Council PCE - Perchloroethylene PHA - Public Health Assessment SDWA - Safe Drinking Water Act SGA - Small for Gestational Age TCE - Trichloroethylene THMs - Trihalomethanes TLBW - Term Low Birth Weight USMC - U.S. Marine Corps VA - Department of Verterans Affairs VOC - Volatile Organic Compounds MCB Camp Lejeune Drinking Water Systems Drinking Water System Requirements and Sampling Efforts Notification and Outreach Scientific Studies and Health Activities Since 1941, Camp Lejeune’s mission has been to prepare warfighters for deployment for combat and humanitarian missions abroad. The Base, which encompasses 236 square miles (156,000 acres), provides housing, facilities, training lands, and logistical support for warfighters. The interference with THM results was inconsistent. The test results varied between drinking water samples collected at different times. The purpose of the study was to evaluate potential associations between exposures to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The report consisted of a review of scientific and medical literature as well as an assessment of current and proposed ATSDR studies. The purpose of this study was to determine if maternal exposures to the drinking water contaminants at Camp Lejeune increased the risk of neural tube defects, oral clefts, and childhood hematopoietic cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposures of Marine and Naval personnel to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune increased risk of mortality from cancers and other chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether potential exposures to the drinking water contaminants at Camp Lejeune are associated with increased risk of death from specific cancers and other chronic diseases among civilian workers employed at the base. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between residential prenatal exposure to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune between 1968 and 1985 and preterm birth, SGA, TLBW, and MBW. The purpose of this study was to determine if Marines who were exposedto contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune were more likely to have male breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to update the drinking water portionof the PHA that was issued in 1997.